Progress: In the studio

“Untitled (Sky)” Oil on Canvas – 8″ x 10″

The first ‘on canvas’ iteration of the monochrome schematic. The pentimenti creating depth and energy. Unlike the en-plein-air sketches, the studio canvases don’t, as yet have the date and time inscribed. This is something I hope to include in future but I don’t want it to look contrived. This painting was already in motion when I realised it was becoming a Monochrome, so the opportunity for any inscription had passed. Inscriptions, I think, should be applied to the virgin canvas and it may or may not remain visible.

 

 

North Sea Studies: 01 April 2018

The process of documenting the sea and the sky from life seems so simple and straightforward until I actually try to do it. More often than not, after carting my ‘kit’ to the edge of the cliff before the North Sea, I sit trapped in awe at the majesty of nature and am left impotent by the impossibility of the task. I force myself to work and, astonishingly manage to produce something interesting. Somehow these responses do indeed capture something of the experience of being there.

SK0104/181240

SE0104/181240

SE0104/181259

SE0104/181254

SE0104/181251

SK0104/181245

 

Monochromes

This first post is a slight introduction to where I am as an artist at the moment. I won’t go into detail of how my work has led to this point, you just need to accept that it has. Suffice to say that I have been attempting to represent the world around me, in paint, as simply and as purely as possible yet still convey my experience of nature with intensity.

In an effort to further simplify (there’s nothing so complex and complicated as simplicity) I’m developing a raft of ‘monochrome’ paintings drawn from the dominant tonal and/or chromatic value of the North Sea at Cambois at any given time of day (time determined by my availability to go and look at/work from it!) These cardboard studies are early, liberated musings on the concept.

Painting depicting colour of the North Sea at a specific moment

SE2903/181923

SK2903/181927

SK2903/181922

The ‘codes’ on each piece (that also inspires their titles) is a simple number string denoting time and date when the works were produced. These ‘strings’ will become more meaningful when ascribed to the in-situ paintings that will form faithful attempts at representing the prevailing tone and colour at any given minute or minutes as I witness those variations.